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Hummus: 3 methods

Lunch board with hummus, veggies, fresh sourdough, and all the toppings

Lunch board with hummus, veggies, fresh sourdough, and all the toppings

 

1. Instant Pot No Soak 

 

2. Instant Pot Pre-Soak

 

3. Traditional Simmer with Pre-Soak

 

 

Pic from Minimalist Baker, recipe  here

Pic from Minimalist Baker, recipe here

Homemade hummus is a luxury.  It's smooth, warm, and mega flavor party in your mouth.  It makes an impressive appetizer for entertaining, and can be a bed for cool toppings like tabbouleh as in Minimalist Baker's Shawarma Dip (a big hit at the NBA draft party I went to earlier this summer). 

In a blind taste test (with many design flaws including lack of standardization, full disclosure!), my man enjoyed hummus #2 the best.  My fave was the OG #3 but they were all so good I'll probably keep making #1 or #2 since it was fast.  Soaking beans takes zero extra hands on time, you just need to have the beans ahead of time.

I added kombu seaweed to the beans which is said to help them digest better due to the minerals/enzymes in the seaweed.  I'm obsessed with sea veggies because I love all things Asian, plus they have sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, phosphorus and other trace minerals that we need for healthy bones and electrolyte balance.  You can find kombu in the Asian section of Whole Foods or on Amazon here.  

Other ways to enjoy homemade hummus:

  • on sandwiches with thin cukes, sprouts, and avocado
  • open face toast with tomatoes, evoo and good salt
  • on salads 
  • as a creamy dressing base by adding lemon, more tahini, water and salt to taste, shake in a jar
  • on Swedish crisp bread
  • with par-cooked carrots
  • on tender lettuce boats
  • seaweed chips
  • on steamed broccoli with olive oil, lemon zest and nutritional yeast

I hope you enjoy this cooking science experiment, feel empowered to make your own and ditch the can!

 

1. Instant Pot No Soak

Pros: 

Fast

Hands off

Cons: 

Texture a little sticky, needed more tahini/water/lemon

 

2. Instant Pot Pre-Soak

Pros: 

Fast

Hands off

Delicious

Smooth

Cons:

Need to plan and soak beans overnight (8-12 hours)

 

3. Traditional Simmer with Pre-Soak

Pros: 

Traditional method makes me feel super old school and un-rushed, and I like that

Tastes delicious and good texture

Probably the most healthy for digestion since the beans are soaked and boiled slow

Cons:

Requires planning and several hours.  But it becomes a "pro" when you make it a good weekend project while you clean and do laundry.  

 

You will need:

1 cup organic dried chickpeas

1 sheet kombu (dried seaweed)

1 lemon, juiced

1/2 cup tahini

2 tbsp evoo (extra virgin olive oil, I like a good organic California type)

3/4 tsp Himalayan pink salt

1/2 cup reserved chickpea liquid

1 clove garlic (optional)

 

Method 1: Full on Instant Pot No Soak

1. Rinse/drain chickpeas in a mesh strainer and add to instant pot with 4 cups water and 1 sheet kombu.  Close lid and make sure vent is set to "sealed" position. 

2. Set to manual high pressure, 35 minutes.

3. When time is done, allow full natural pressure release (takes about 25 minutes).  If you are short on time, allow natural pressure release for 15 minutes and then do a quick pressure release.  

4. save 1/2 cup chickpea liquid, discard kombu seaweed and drain beans.

5. In food processor, pulse beans into paste.  With blade running, add tahini, lemon juice, olive oil, garlic, salt.  Lastly, add chickpea liquid slowly until you reach a texture you like (might need more or less liquid).  Taste and adjust seasoning.

6. serve warm, make a center indent with a spoon and pour in a puddle of evoo.  Serve with sliced cukes, warm sourdough bread, seaweed crisps, par-boiled carrots, or tender lettuce cups.  

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Method 2: Pre-Soak beans then finish in Instant Pot

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1. Rinse/drain dried chickpeas then place in large bowl and fill with cold water.  Cover with tea towel 8-12 hours or overnight.

2. Rinse/drain and follow instructions for method 1, but decrease instant pot time to 25 minutes.  

 

 

 

 

 

Method 3: Original Gangster Traditional "I Have All Day Long and Like To Do Things Slowly" Soak and Simmer 

Traditional method in my Le Creuset dutch oven, any big pot works 

Traditional method in my Le Creuset dutch oven, any big pot works 

1. Rinse/drain dried chickpeas then place in large bowl and fill with cold water.  Cover with tea towel 8-12 hours or overnight.

2. Rinse/drain and place in large pot, cover with several inches of cold water, add kombu seaweed to the pot.

3. Bring to boil and reduce heat to simmer.  Cook until beans are tender and can easily be mashed with a fork (took me over 2 hours).  Skim off any foam.

4. Follow instructions for hummus in Method 1 :)

 

 

Where does Ayurveda fit in?

Fresh food has more prana or life force.  Canned or packaged food lacks prana and increases tamas, which can lead to heaviness or dullness in the body, skin, and the mind.  Eating foods with high prana like fresh fruits and vegetables and homemade food infuses your body and mind with more vitality and creativity.  

Vata: if you have a vata constitution, you have erratic digestion, tend towards gas with beans, or tend to feel anxious or overwhelmed, definitely eat this warm.  Serve with fresh sourdough bread or as a topping for steamed veggies (think warm and cooked, not cold and raw).

Pitta: if you are a pitta constitution, you have strong digestion, you tend towards inflammed or red skin rashes, and your mind is sharp and sometimes critical, balance your internal heat with things that cool, like bitter greens and veggies.  Serve hummus on sliced cukes, roasted beets, baby spinach, or red leaf lettuce boats. 

Kapha: if you are a kapha consitution, feel congested, have extra weight, sluggish digestion, or feel foggy or dull, balance with light, dry and pungent.  Seaweed crisps, bitter greens, steamed broccoli, or steamed collard wraps are best for you.  

 

 Enjoy!

Namaste,

Lauren